An Excerpt from Diane Burkhour’s story, The Train Engineer

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Now that we have gotten to know Author Diane Burkhour a little better, lets take a peek inside the world of Mrs. North and The Train Engineer.

 

“Roy, oh Roy,” Mrs. North called out to him several hours later. His back was to her as he concentrated on his work.  “Here, I figured you needed to take a break.  You’ve been working so hard. I brought you some watermelon.”

Roy turned around, and Mrs. North handed him a plate with a fat slice of red, juicy watermelon.

Just then, off in the distance they heard the faint whistle of a train’s steam engine.  Roy’s head jerked up towards the sound. A sad look came over his face, which didn’t escape Mrs. North’s attention.  The whistle faded off into the distance.

“Go on and sit down over there in the shade and enjoy it.”

Roy couldn’t speak.  He nodded his head in thanks as his eyes became misty.  It had been a long time since anyone had treated him with such kindness.

“Oh, the shutters look beautiful.  You really are a good painter,” she told him, quite pleased.

“I’m just about done with them, and then I’ll do your front door.  That shouldn’t take long,” he told her in between taking bites of the luscious watermelon.

“Oh good.  That should be perfect timing then.  Sounds like you’ll be done in time for supper.”

Mrs. North disappeared once more into the house with the empty plate.  She began to season the chicken, prepare the vegetables and peel the potatoes as she hummed to herself.

Roy had finished painting and everything was cleaned up and put back into place.  He walked up to the kitchen screen door.  He could hear Mrs. North’s humming, teedum-teedum twiddle deedum.  He peeked in as he raised his hand to knock.  No, it couldn’t be! The kitchen broom was dancing around the kitchen on its own.  Roy took a step back.  He closed his eyes and rubbed them.  “I must have been out in the sun to long.”

He drew in a deep breath, and looked inside again.  Everything seemed to be normal.  Yep, there was the broom standing in a corner against the wall.  He knocked.

Mrs. North came to let him in.  “Oh, all done, are you?  Good!  Good!  Now I’m going to start frying up this chicken, so why don’t you go into the bathroom and clean up.  Take a good hot bath.  I put some clean towels out for you.  There’s a spare bedroom next to the bathroom.  I put your canvas bag in there.”

Once again, all Roy could do was nod.  He didn’t quite know what to make of this tiny, white- haired, cheerful woman.  How could she be so trusting?

He went into the spare bedroom to get his razor.  On the bed was a pair of brand new overalls, and a new denim shirt just his size.  “How the heck?” he mumbled, as he shook his head in disbelief.  And that wasn’t all.  Hanging on a chain from the center of the ceiling was a replica of an old railroad lantern serving as a light.  Roy just stood staring, shaking his head back and forth.

 

As always, please feel free to leave comments and questions here for Diane or visit her on the Somerset Ink Facebook page at Facebook.com/SomersetInk

Or at somersetinkwritersgroup@gmail.com

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Lets Meet Author Diane Burkhour

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Diane Burkhour is a member of Somerset Ink Writer’s Group and one of the contributing authors of First Thursday’s.

Lets visit with Diane and get to know her a little.

Diane, you have written a wonderful story The Train Engineer—tell us how did you start? Where did this special story come from?

Mrs. North was a combination of an older woman than myself who I would like to be a bit magical. I love nature and going to flea markets. Roy’s character and situation just developed as I wrote.

We are nothing without our characters. They are the ones who tell our stories and connect with the readers for us. At some point in the writing process, they become real to us and we as authors become invested in what happens as the plot evolves.

Tell us about the relationship you developed with your characters.

I felt like Mrs. North was perhaps like a special grandmotherly friend to me. Roy was a good, gentle man, who through no luck of his own had some bad luck. My heart went out to him and I wanted to help him out.

If you were a new character introduced into the story who would you be?

I really don’t know!

Themes and plots are always a hot topic at writer’s conferences and workshops. While it is the theme’s job to tell the “what” of the story and remains a constant throughout, it’s the job of the “plot” to tell the “how” and it is ever evolving.

How did your plot progress throughout your writing process? Did it surprise you?

I wasn’t sure how Roy’s situation was going to be resolved. As I wrote I surprised myself as I came upon the idea of a tourist town with the glass factory. I got that idea form the movie, “Sweet Home Alabama.” Instead of the wonder getting there by plane. I thought of a tourist train. Then the rest of the story just fell into place.

A great many of us begin to work on a story and work on it, and work on it and work on it—

At what point in your writing journey did you feel truly committed to finishing this story?

This was the second Mrs. North story I had written. It was fun for me to write and I was committed and wanted to write the entire story from when I first started working on it

Many people in the industry sat that writing a story is the easy part— publishing and marketing is the hard part.

Now that you are in the publishing/ market process would you agree?

I would definitely agree. I remember going to a writing seminar and someone stood up and said that trying to get his story published took the fun out of writing for him. I tend to agree with him.

Self-publishing can be an overwhelming prospect for many authors. What did you learn from the process?

I learned that it is a lot of tedious work, checking and rechecking for any type of grammatical, spacing and punctuation errors, among designing a book cover, and making sure everything is according to the publishing regulations.

What’s next for your characters?

I do have another Mrs. North story sitting on the back burner with different characters I have to finish with different characters. I also have an idea for another Mrs. Norths story a little different from the others.

Is there a favorite writer who has influenced your writing?

Not really. I loved fairy tales growing up, and still do!

What other writing projects can we look forward to enjoying from you?

Right now, my goal like I mentioned is to finish my other Mrs. North story and hopefully write one more. Who knows what else my imagination will come up with.

Describe the top secret writing sanctuary you will build when you are an award winning, millionaire author.

I would love a small, quiet place with lots of windows and natural light overlooking a lake, in a wooded area with paths to stroll along, and for a change of scenery, perhaps another small retreat house on a tropical island overlooking the ocean, situated in a quaint, quiet town.

Please feel free to leave any comments or questions for Diane here or visit her at somersetinkwritersgroup@gmail.com  or visit her at our Facebook page at Facebook.com/SomersetInk

An excerpt from Balancing Bella by Kimberlee Thompson

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Now that we have had a chance to get to know Kimbrelee, lets take a peek at Bella Balancing , Kim’s contribution to First Thursdays

 

First, my sister and her endless need for assistance; then, noisy new neighbors.  I tried not to pity myself, then decided donut consolation was called for.  I dumped my Dunkin Donuts bag on my desk, dropped my purse, and inhaled two chocolate honey-glazed.  That would cost me an hour on the treadmill, some day, but not today.

My voicemail had six messages on it, so I had to get to work immediately after listening and donut dunking.  I worked at an agency scheduling private-duty nurses, and the day’s emergencies kept my mind off my personal problems.  So many people needed help these days, especially with elderly parents.  My job could be stressful, but I did find satisfaction knowing that no patient was left alone, at risk.  I felt personally responsible for all of my most helpless clients and their families.

I schlepped off to yoga after work and dutifully down-dogged and sun-saluted.  I usually enjoyed my class, but I merely went through the motions this time.  My mind was clogged with worries about the lease I’d co-signed for Bella and her $800 per month rent.  Would I end up paying it again in June?  Bella promised she’d get another job; I hoped she was on it.  And what would I find when I got home?  More hammering and head-banging music?  So much for relaxation pose.

I returned home and was pleasantly surprised to find my parking space empty and the building quiet.  Bella had left a message on my machine.  Joseph had been unable to pull any strings with the library, but his friend’s auto-body shop needed an office assistant and he’d set up an interview for Bella tomorrow.  Maybe I could have enjoyed that yoga class after all, things were taking care of themselves.  I sighed and flopped on the couch, remote in hand, and kicked off my shoes.  Now I could relax.

The next week passed quietly enough, with Bella calling occasionally to report on her new job at the auto body shop.  She wasn’t so slick with the computer, but her outgoing personality kept the customers, and the owner, happy.  Joseph was obviously a smart landlord, having gotten both a co-signer and a job for his new tenant.

My new neighbors kept pretty regular and fairly quiet hours once they settled in.  There was a loud party on the Saturday after they moved in, but everyone’s entitled to a Saturday night now and then. Except me, of course.  My social life was pretty nonexistent.

So when Bella called with an invite I would usually have turned down, I responded eagerly.  “Reney, the people at the shop and Joseph and I are all going out for dinner and drinks on Friday.  We’re celebrating how everything worked out well for all of us:  I got a job, Joe’s getting rent, and Mike’s got somebody at his desk who doesn’t mind the noise and paint smell.  Mike’s my new boss, he’s awesome at matching paint.  If you ever get in an accident, you know where to come for repairs.”

“Bella, dinner sounds good, but I’m in no hurry for an accident.  I’m glad you’re happy, though.”  And I was.  Could my sister just be a late-bloomer who was finally in flower?  My bank account and I hoped so.  Until the first petal fell with Bella’s next breath.

“Um, Reney?

 

Please feel free to ask Kimberlee any questions you may have about Balancing Bella, her other writing projects, First Thursadys, or Somerset Ink.

You can reach her here, at somersetinkwritersgroup@gmail.com or at the Somerset Ink facebook page at Facebook.com/SomersetInk

Meet Author Kimberlee Thompson

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In February of 2018, the authors of Somerset Ink writer’s group published their first collective work, First Thursdays, a wonderful collection of short stories, which takes its readers on a fascinating journey of Enchantment, Murder, Abandonment, Hope and Awakenings.

The only thing more interesting than the book are its authors.

Lets meet Kimberlee Thompson author of Balancing Bella.

You have written and published a wonderful story

Tell us… how did it all start? Where did your idea for this special story come from?

I had a friend who used to talk about her “younger older sister.” From there, I stitched together bits and pieces of real life and imagination to create Balancing Bella. For a short time, I did have to book nurses for an employer’s disabled elder and it was very stressful to make sure that his severe needs were covered at all times.

If you were a character introduced in this story who would you be?

I would be Reney, and that’s why I tried to teach us both to discard a few snap judgments.

How did your plot progress throughout your writing process? Did it ever surprise you?

I started with Reney and Bella, and I had to get them bunking together. I have both friends and relatives who’ve been through fires, so I guess the idea spontaneously combusted!

A great many of us begin a story and work on it, and work on it, and work on it.

At what point in your writing journey did you feel truly committed to finishing this story?

This one kind of flowed, and at 7,000 words, Balancing Bella, is the longest short story I’ve written ever. But, OMG, the editing! Somerset Ink group-edited for our e-book, and every time of many times, we found a mistake missed on a previous take.

Listen in on writer’s group meetings around the world and you will hear more about the things that sabotage the writing process than things that move it forward.

How did you escape those traps?

Dumb luck. I did NaNoWriMo and actually finished a novel in the 30 days, but have never fleshed out and edited that work. This one…got done. Magic elixir, pixie dust, winning lottery ticket when that happens.

Many people in the industry say that writing the story is the easy part…publishing and marketing- that’s the hard part.

Now that you are in the publishing/marketing process would you agree?

I do not partake in social media, so yes. (Except Pinterest for pictures of cats, hockey players, and oddities).

Self-publishing can be an overwhelming prospect for many authors.

What did you learn from the process?

Without Somerset Ink, I’d probably still be noodling around. Self-publishing as a group really helped with the nuts and bolts aspects. And without Marie Catalfamo as a driving force, it would’ve lingered on instead of progressing. My winter malaise was nothing for Marie’s can-do attitude.

Sooo… tell us is there a sequel in the making?

What’s next for your characters?

I haven’t thought about it. I usually write fairy tales and magical reality, so a down-to-earth family drama like Balancing Bella is a departure for me. I think I’ll go play somewhere else next. Maybe a good dose of Ray Bradbury is needed first to get me back into flight.

How does being part of a writer’s group help you with your writing?

Being part of Somerset Ink keeps my feet moving when my brain has stopped. It’s a way to keep in the writerly way even if I’m feeling more pet-the-cats and make popcorn-y.

Is there a favorite writer who has inspired your writing?

Ray Bradbury, just by his volume, imagination and longevity. Margaret Atwood the same, and she’s much more funny than people realize. And she likes hockey, even did an “instructional” video on how to play in net. I don’t write crime, or read much of it, but Megan Abbott does it in a way that is much more than who-dunnit. And nobody captures the feeling of what it’s like to be a teenage girl like her, it takes me back to the ways I used to think and do.

What other writing projects can we look forward to enjoying from you?

Remember that NaNoWriMo novel? A girl sees her dead brother on a bus one day…once I edit and fill in the parts I glossed over in thirty days.

Describe the top secret writing sanctuary you will build when you become an award winning, millionaire author.

First, I will steal Ivan Albright’s painting, The Vermonter, and hang it in my space. The hands alone are magical. I don’t think a million goes so far these days, so theft might be in order, though I’ll outsource the job. Since I’m keeping stolen art in my lair, I can’t tell you where it is.

We look forward to reading all further works from Kimberlee.

If you have any questions or comments for Kimberlee please feel free to contact her here at Writer’s Block or visit her and the other authors of First Thursdays on their Facebook page at Facebook.com/SomersetInk or at somersetinkwritersgroup@gmail.com

First Thursdays can be purchased world wide wherever eBooks are sold.

An excerpt from Anniversaries

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Now that you have had a chance to get to know author Marie Catalfamo a bit, lets take a peek at her story Anniversaries, Marie’s contribution to Somerset Ink’s book First Thursdays.

Barbara Franklin flung the newspaper into her gold-latticed wastebasket. She had been putting the final touches on her person when the headline, “Who Killed Carol Lumber,” caught her eye. Her mind immediately went back to a life she had taken such pains to obliterate. How ironic that she was now the Chairperson of the Annual Children’s Fundraiser. She had coveted Mrs. Lumber’s lifestyle all during the time she was one of her volunteers. Now she was looked upon as benevolent and charitable and Carol was where she belonged—dead and in the trash. Yes, the trash was where Carol Lumber belonged.
Stop it! Stop it! She commanded herself. Don’t go back there. Taking deep calming breaths, Barbara went to the hall mirror for a final check on her hair and makeup. The wet bar’s reflection caused her head to turn sharply and her mouth to water. Perfectly lined Baccarat glasses were sweetly calling her. Though the matching pitcher was full of ice water, for one moment, her senses smelled the perfection of an apple martini. Like a cat upon a mouse, Barbara pounced on the unopened bottle of Stolichnaya. She hungrily broke its seal and poured a hefty glassful. Falling back into old habits, she sat on the tall bar chair, legs crossed and swiveled from side to side. Raising the magic liquid to her lips, she was startled by the violent sound of her voice.
“I said, Stop It. Stop It Now!” Her shaking hand set down the glass, liquid spilling onto the polished maple wood. It had been twenty-four years, three months and six days since the drunken stupor that ended one life and altered another, taking Barbara straight to AA. And it was all because of Carol Lumber. For the second time that morning she calmed herself with deep breaths and returned to the hall mirror. The image that stared back at her brought a satisfied smile. The severe, yet stylishly dyed chestnut hair color softened her thin, angular face. She centered the gold Omega necklace that circled her swan-like neck. No one would ever know what it truly cost her. Barbara quickly checked her freshly manicured blood red nails and reapplied her matching lipstick. “No doubt about it,” she thought, giving a final brush of her navy linen jacket for imaginary lint, “the old Barbara is dead. And this Barbara is here to stay!” With complete calm, she headed for the meeting.

Meet Author Marie Catalfamo

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In February of 2018, the authors of Somerset Ink writer’s group published their first collective work, First Thursdays, a wonderful collection of short stories, which takes its readers on a fascinating journey of Enchantment, Murder, Abandonment, Hope and Awakenings.

The only thing more interesting than the book are its authors.

Let’s meet Marie Catalfamo author of Anniversaries.

 

You have written and published a wonderful story…

Tell us… how did it all start? Where did your idea for this special story come from?

Anniversaries came from my love of reading mysteries and challenging myself to come up with a unique method of murder and a killer that wouldn’t be revealed until the very end. I believe I’ve succeeded in providing a Hitchcock flair with Agatha’s Christie’s writing style.

We are nothing without our characters. They are the ones who tell our story and connect with the readers for us. At some point in the writing process, they become real to us and we as authors become invested in what happens to them as the plot evolves.

Tell us about the relationship you developed with your characters.

As Anniversaries is a short murder mystery story, I didn’t want to draw from well-known murders or stereo-type characters. So I removed myself from the characters, acting more as a detective fleshing out their sketchy backgrounds and motives.

If you were a new character introduced in this story who would you be?

I would definitely be an innocent bystander who’s accidentally the one who solves the case.

Themes and Plots are always a hot button topic at writer’s conferences and workshops. While it’s the theme’s job to tell the “what” of the story and remains a constant throughout, it’s the job of the plot to tell the “how” and it, is ever evolving.

How did your plot progress throughout your writing process? Did it ever surprise you?

As Anniversaries was the telling of a copycat murder of a cold case, the theme was concrete. How it was to happen using a new slant, was the hardest, and involved many false starts.

A great many of us begin a story and work on it, and work on it, and work on it…

At what point in your writing journey did you feel truly committed to finishing this story?

I was given the great opportunity to have Anniversaries looked at by an editor to a well-known author. Her questions as to the why and/or necessity of certain sections put a fire under me to stop throwing everything into the pot, clean it up and trust my writing.

Listen in on writer’s group meetings around the world and you will hear more about the things that sabotage the writing process than things that move it forward.

How did you escape those traps?

I don’t believe you can escape the writer’s block, procrastination ogre or avoid the many excuses we can create. I try to acknowledge them, put my work aside for a designated period of time and move forward, even if only by one paragraph, one sentence. I finally realized Rome wasn’t built in a day.

Many people in the industry say that writing the story is the easy part…publishing and marketing- that’s the hard part.

Now that you are in the publishing/marketing process would you agree?

Writing is easy in that the only one who rejects it is yourself. You can always change what is on the page. Publishing and/or marketing is exposing your creativity to the opinion of others. Once it’s out there, you’re naked. For unknown authors it becomes more of how to get the word out there than the real reason you’re publishing—to share your talent with others.

Self-publishing can be an overwhelming prospect for many authors.

What did you learn from the process?

I now have a small insight into what hard cover publishing companies go through to put a book on the shelf. While It may seem that you have more control with self-publishing, for me the opposite is true. You are not only providing a finished copy (editing, formatting,), you are also responsible for marketing, advertising and you make most decisions on format, advertising, self-marketing, etc.

Sooo… tell us is there a sequel in the making?

For Anniversaries, not at this time. As to another First Thursdays collection, that will be the decision of the Somerset Ink Writer’s Group members.

How does being part of a writer’s group help you with your writing?

I would become lazy without the members of Somerset Ink. From each story review, I not only learn about my writing style, but get new tips from the style of the members. We all have particular genres from which I have learned that, no matter the genre, the character(s) must be real for the content to be believable.

Is there a favorite writer who has inspired your writing?

I admire the old time authors—Margaret Mitchell, Agatha Christie, Steinbeck, Harper Lee, Dickens—where the stories are driven by strong, 3-D characters.

What other writing projects can we look forward to enjoying from you?

My experience with Anniversaries and self-publishing has spurred me to finish my first novel, Time to Come Home. Based on actual events, it tells the story of an Italian immigrant who’s forced to leave home for America in the early 20th century.

Describe the top secret writing sanctuary you will build when you become an award winning, millionaire author.

As I require background noise and ample space to act out book scenes, the sound of the ocean, sitting on a lanai in Hawaii would be lovely.

We look forward to reading Time to Come Home, when its completed, and all further works from Marie.

If you have any questions or comments for Marie please feel free to contact her here at Writer’s Block or visit her and the other authors of First Thursdays on their Facebook page at Facebook.com/SomersetInk or at somersetinkwritersgroup@gmail.com

First Thursdays can be purchased world wide wherever eBooks are sold.

 

 

 

An Interview with Author John Williams

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It’s been so long since my last post I should be ashamed. And I am. It has not been for a lack of interest or desire but rather the pull of “life interrupting” that has kept me at bay.

But I have been inspired once again by the dedication and persistence of a fellow writer who has published his very first novel.

Here is my conversation with John Williams about his newly released novel, Exit To Eden.

 

Congratulations John- You Did It!!!

You wrote and published your first novel.

So many aspiring authors have a novel in them and spend years working on it but never seem to cross the finish line. You did… what an accomplishment.

How does it feel???

Yes I did finish and self publish my first novel, and it feels great. I have a copy on my writing desk and sometimes I just stare at it and say (did I do that?)

It was hard work (a labor of love I might add) putting the story together and at times it seemed that the right words or sentences would never come together so I would take a deep breath, scratch my head and keep plugging away then somehow out of the blue the ideas would flow. I guess there is truth in the old adage that hard work and perseverance pays off.  When the last words of the last sentence where down, it felt good to have stuck with it to the end. I was filled with a great sense of joy and relief that it was finally done. Yet after I finished the final chapter, there was a feeling that I had lost a friend, one who I had chatted with and passed ideas around with for years. However I consoled myself by envisioning that I might someday come back and chat with my old friend.

 

 

Tell us… how did it all start? Where did your idea come from?

I started writing the manuscript, off and on, I’m ashamed to say, almost ten years ago when I was still fully employed. After retirement, I devoted most of my time to finishing the novel and writing short stories in between. The inspiration for the book came from swallowing and regurgitating events, good and bad, of the world around me. It seems that throughout history many cultures of the world have suffered times when corruption and murderous acts rule their societies, so in order to save anything or anybody worthy of saving, only a total destruction of the wicked in those cultures make a new beginning possible. Sadly today, many societies all around the world seem to be trending toward their day of destruction, only time will tell if they survive. But for now their stories are there to be told, to be weaved hopefully into an entertaining and unforgettable tale of redemption and rebirth.

 

We are nothing without our characters. They are the ones who tell our story and connect with the readers for us. At some point in the writing process, they become real to us and we as authors become invested in what happens to them as the plot evolves.

Tell us about the relationship you developed with your characters.

Many of the characters in the book are people that take charge both good and bad. Some definitely mirror real people that shape the world we live in today. I try to take the characters that are good and put them into situations that test their spirit, their will to survive and unlike many of today’s young author who are willing to let evil win, I strive to show that, although some may die while others live, in the struggle for life, good will triumph over evil. And while the evil characters have their turn at bat with the bases load, they can score runs but I will never let them win the game.

 

Themes and Plots are always a hot button topic at writer’s conferences and workshops. While it’s the theme’s job to tell the “what” of the story and remains a constant throughout, it’s the job of the plot to tell the “how” and it, is ever evolving.

How did your plot progress throughout your writing process? Did it ever surprise you?

The theme of the story was clear in my mind many months before I began to write. Like many sculptures say, the median that they are working with tells them which direction to go in. I think that the same can be said for many artists. A certain brush stroke, one way or another by a painter may direct him or her to advance in a way that they were unaware until that moment. The same I think happens to fiction writers at least is was that way for me. For me, the plot line was like a day dream, my imagination could run wild and no harm was done. Bits and pieces of past and current events along with a made up future helped move the plot along. As for surprises, the biggest surprise came when I revisited the final product and realized that for better or for worst I had put together word after word, sentence after sentence a story that someday someone might find pleasure in reading.

A great many of us begin our novel and work on it, and work on it, and work on it…

At what point in your writing journey did you feel truly committed to finishing?

In a world with so many well known and prolific writers, being a novice author trying to enter their world is very intimidating. I began my novel as a sort of a way to blow off stream about a world I saw as sometimes cruel and unjust. As the pages grew, the story became something more than just a way to express my distaste for certain world events. At some point, at what I know now as half way through my novel, I realized that I had to go where the paper was taking me. I had to lead the characters to their final destination.

 

Listen in on writer’s group meetings around the world and you will hear more about the things that sabotage the writing process than things that move it forward.

How did you escape those traps?

I think that the biggest thing that can sabotage the writing process is fear – fear that the work is not good enough- fear of rejection. Also not being willing to commit the time is a major trap. Writing a novel is not for everyone it takes and enormous amount of time and effort to turn out a good work. I put my fear of rejection behind knowing that I would take the time to give it my best shot and if that was not good enough then so be it; I have plenty more things to do in my life.

 

Many people in the industry say that writing the story is the easy part…publishing and marketing- that’s the hard part.

Now that you have done it all would you agree?

In today’s world, publishing and marketing a book is enormously difficult as compared to writing the novel. Writing a novel fact or fiction, although it’s hard work, is mostly done at the writer’s convenience in the author’s comfort zone whereas finding a publisher for a first time author, unless you are somehow connected or you are that rare, exceptionally new talent, it is almost impossible to find a publisher that will risk taking you on. Enter the world of self-publishing. If one is luckily enough to fine a publisher or elects to self-publishing, then comes the task that I think most authors would rather not do and that’s selling the book. Fiction writers, who I think are mostly quite types and not salesman, would rather just write and leave the publishing and marketing details to others.

 

Self-publishing can be an overwhelming prospect for many authors.

What did you learn from the process?

Because of the intense competition and enormous cost associated with publishing and marketing a book, most novice author fined it almost impossible to connect with main stream publishing houses. Self publishing has provided the novice a way of bring their work out of the shadows and into the light to compete with the rest of the world’s authors. But the word self in Self publishing means that the focus is on self, yourself. All the things that a publisher would do if they took you on is now your responsibly, of which editing is the most important. A good editor well verse in your genre is crucial. A well thought out title, a relevant and handsome book cover as is a well written synopsis for the back cover are all important items to be dealt with if one is considering self publishing. Most of all do not try and rush the process. There is the temptation that once the manuscript in done to rush it to publication but as in carpentry, the saying ‘measure twice and cut once’ goes well with self-publishing also. Those considering self-publishing should check twice that all bases have been cover and then check the bases one more time to make sure the manuscript is ready to go.

Sooo… tell us is there a sequel in the making?

What’s next for your characters?

There is a chance of a sequel, the characters remaining at the end of the story I feel deserve to live on someday. But right now I’m fascinated by a series I’ve been working on where two retired college professors of Ancient History and Mythology, a husband and wife team, who opened a bed and breakfast on Long Island New York, meet one night with an evil Mythological creature.  Drawing on their knowledge of Ancient History and Mythology, they narrowly escape being devoured and somehow manage to defeat the evil being that preyed upon them that night. Embolden by their victory they decide that a B&B life, after what they had just gone thought was dullsville. So they sold the B&B and set out to use their new found talent to locate and stamp out evil wherever they find it.

Wow that sounds great!

We are very excited for you and all your friends at Somerset Ink are very proud of you.

Keep writing…we want more.

If you have read John’s book, which can be previewed and purchased through Amazon, and would like to leave a review, comment or question for John, please to do. John would love to hear from you…Lets start a discussion.